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Making the jump. Quitting your job. Making a living outside of your 9-5. These things are difficult to do, and one of the things that prevents most from ever doing it is the risk. The risk of being stuck out in the cold and suddenly unable to find work. That’s a scary thing, and for good reason – nobody wants to have faced that fear and failed.

Mitigating the risk of this situation is something that’s worth considering, and worth putting long, deliberate thought to. Many startups have the opportunity to blow up in your face, and one of the great benefits of a consulting company is that it can be run in an efficient fashion that isn’t nearly as volatile. ….

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The habit I’ve most wanted to break in the early stages of having others work at Siege relates to problems with differentiating between “I vs We”. I vs we is the pronoun choice that says very little, but also says a whole lot.

The use of one versus the other can happen more than you think. On phone calls, when talking to others on the team, in conversations with friends. When you begin talking about the state of the company, it is no longer just you. It is a team. It is not your client. It is our client. It is not your decision, it is our decision. I am not doing the work. We are doing the work. I didn’t build this. We built this. ….

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Nine months ago I quit my job to start my first company, Siege Media. Three months later, I talked about the mysticism of entrepreneurship, “taking the jump” and how the process was remarkably easy – and also, something I probably should have done earlier.

It was and it is, but that doesn’t make building a company an absolutely smooth ride. Running a consulting business in a state of mediocrity is relatively simple – the demand for SEO services is great and if you’re at all active online, client inquiries come rather easily. ….

Duplicate/thin content is almost always bad, and it’s sometimes difficult to find it on our websites, especially the bigger ones. Lots of different advanced operators and code searches can bring up some bad content, but there’s another method I haven’t seen discussed that can also do a lot of good towards finding content we can deindex from the search engines: deep diving in Google Analytics.

In particular, what you should do first is open up a date range short enough to not capture tons of changes you might have already to page indexation based on a site audit or whatever, but wide enough to get a significant amount of data, and then sort by “Traffic Sources -> Organic”, so you are only seeing traffic from search. ….

How I Improved My Public Speaking

December 12, 2012 Presentations

In mid 2011, I had what was really my first speaking gig, at SMX Advanced, about link building. I had done a link building clinic before 10 or so people before, but this was the first serious thing I had done – talking before 200-300 some odd internet marketers in Seattle. I was an introvert, […]

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Introducing Siege Media

November 29, 2012 Miscellaneous Strategies

Today is the official launch of Siege Media, my digital marketing consultancy. Check out the blog for the official announcement post. For those wondering what the launching of the blog there means for the state of RossHudgens.com, it’s safe to say that most digital-marketing-centric “tactics” will find themselves on SiegeMedia.com, and the more entrepreneurship/personal/entertainment type pieces […]

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Digital Marketing Keyword Interest Over Time

November 27, 2012 Marketing

Google’s Keyword Trends tool is extremely interesting to me. Here, we can see if businesses, tactics, and more are in free fall, growth, or stagnation. We can potentially identify stock opportunities or similarly, when we should eject or short a company. We can see the interest levels in our competitor. Below, I identified several searches […]

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Authority Bloat: An SEO Industry Problem

November 20, 2012 SEO Theory

A few years ago, I did work for a client with seasonal burst  - and not just “sorta” seasonal burst, a seasonal-exclusive burst, that required extremely aggressive link building techniques. This client was in a space that had what I now define as a high competitive backlink crossover (CBC) that often comes with a certain […]

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Making The Jump: Reflections Three Months In

November 5, 2012 Entrepreneurship

Three months ago, I made the jump to entrepreneurship. Since that time, I’ve been asked a few questions about what that process has been like, so I thought I would write a little update post to give a little context to the experience, with some specificity to SEO and the agency environment in general. There […]

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How to Get a Job in SEO

October 31, 2012 Presentations

Yesterday, I was lucky enough to give a talk to the University of Washington INFO 320 “Information Needs, Searching, and Presentation” class, about what they need to do to get hired in search and SEO specifically. Although many of the suggestions are SEO specific, many of the tips I offered can be cross-referenced to any job […]

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How to Get Accepted to Speak at SMX

October 8, 2012 Content Strategy

I’ve had the good fortune of being selected to speak at SMX events three times now. While I’m no Vanessa Fox, who seems to appear 95 times speaking per event, I feel like I have a decent idea, now, of what it takes to get selected to speak at the conference. Speaking at SMX is […]

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Cognitive Bias at Play in SEO

October 3, 2012 SEO Theory

You will often times find people who say things like “EMDs should rank well”, “Google Plus will succeed”, “guest posting will always work”, “Pinterest is worth investing in”, “white hat %&$ing works”, “infographics can be successful”, and etc. While these are all things that can and might be true, the reality is the author of […]

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